The Differences Between US and UK Crochet Stitches, Hooks and Terms

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The Differences Between US and UK Crochet Stitches, Hooks and Terms

If you’re just learning to crochet, it can seem as if you’re learning a whole new language. Add to that the differences between US and UK stitches and hook sizes, it can become quite a challenge to get a hang of.

That’s why we’ve decided to make these tables with different sizes and stitches. They are easy to use as reference and you can even print them out to keep in your project bag or hook tidy.

Right at the end of the article, we’ll also give some tips on things to look for to find out whether a pattern uses the US or UK terms.

US and Metric Crochet Hook Size Differences

When it comes to crochet hook sizes, it’s good to have a conversion chart handy when you’re starting out a project. The chart means that you can double-check that you’re using the correct size hook for your project, saving you from having to start over and wondering what it is that you’re doing wrong.

A good rule of thumb is that the UK or European patterns use metric hook sizes (in mm) and US patterns use numbered sizes.

Here are some of the most-used crochet hook sizes in the US and UK sizes.

 CROCHET HOOK CONVERSION CHART US AND UK

US and UK Crochet Stitch Differences

There are some differences between the stitch names that the US and UK give. However, the stitches themselves are not made any difference.

For example, even though a double crochet (US term) is called a treble in UK terms, the stitch is made in exactly the same way.

Once you’ve made sure whether your pattern is a US or UK pattern, you can always print it out and make notes on the paper to help you remember which stitch is which.

Here is a list of the most common crochet stitches and their UK and US names 

US Stitch Name

UK Stitch Name

Slip stitch

Slip stitch

Chain stitch

Chain stitch

Single crochet

Double crochet

Half double crochet

Half treble

Double crochet

Treble

Treble

Double treble

Double treble

Triple treble

Yarn over

Yarn over hook

 

US and UK Crochet Turning Chain Differences

Because of the different stitch names, you will also need to keep count of how many stitches are in your turning chain when you’re working with a pattern that you’re not familiar with.

Here’s a table to make it much easier!

US and UK Turning Chain Differences

US Stitch

UK Stitch

Number of Turning Chain Stitches

Single crochet

Double crochet

1

Half double crochet

Half treble

2

Double crochet

Treble

3

Treble

Double treble

4

Double treble

Triple treble

5

 

These “turning chains” are the stitches at the end or beginning of the row that ensures that your first stitches are the same height as the other stitches in the row.

For example, if you’re working a filet crochet piece, you will need to add three chain stitches after working the last stitch of the row. These stitches will count as the first double crochet/treble stitch of the following row.

A pattern will also tell you when turning chains count as a stitch and when they do not.

Crochet Symbols On Charts and What They Mean

The great thing about crochet charts is that you don’t necessarily need to understand the language that the written pattern is in to be able to follow the chart!

Charts can also help you to double-check where you are in a pattern, as the stitch symbols in the graph or drawn pattern show exactly where each stitch must be placed.

That said, reading charts become easy once you know how they work (even though they look like gibberish when you first look at them).

Take a look at this table with its symbols and the corresponding stitch that should be made for each of the symbols on the charted pattern:

 Crochet symbol and what they mean

Usually these symbols remain consistent across patterns, and as long as you know when it’s a US pattern and when it’s a UK (or almost anywhere else in the world) pattern, you’ll be able to make the crocheted article.

For example, if you see four chain stitch symbols next to each other, it means that you need to make four chain stitches.

The different rows of the pattern, as well as the direction that you’ll be working in, will also be on the pattern. This means that you just need to start at row one and then either work back and forth or in the round, depending on the pattern.

Starting at row 1, make the stitches that correspond with the symbols on the chart, completing the whole of row 1 before moving on to row 2, row 3, etc.

If you’re working on a pattern that has a lot of rows (especially a lot of similar-looking rows), use a highlighter or pencil to mark where you are on the pattern. This is very helpful when you need to step away from your work for any length of time.

Tips for reading and understanding US and UK crochet patterns

  • Before you start, make sure which type of pattern it is — a US pattern or a UK pattern. Most of the world uses UK crochet terms, or will state on the pattern which ones they use.
  • Double check that you’re using the correct size hook for the project and for the yarn that you’re working with.
  • Read through the whole pattern before you start to make sure that you know which stitches will be used. You can then make your own US/UK chart to keep with the pattern. This will help even the most experienced crocheter to remember when to work a treble as a double crochet, for example.

Practice makes perfect! You’ll see as you do more and more crocheting, that reading the different types of patterns become almost second nature!

 

 

 


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